FSCW Products

World Food Waste Network

Acids, Sugars, Terpenes, Phenols, Furans, PEF, PLA, PHA, Biobutanol and Biodiesel are the ten most promising FSCW derived products.

In 2015, 47 delegates from industry, government, research and universities covering 18 countries and 42 institutions discussed the most promising products that could be obtained from FSCW. The top 10 of these are listed below. In addition, all members agreed for sustainable resources to become routine, a set of standards needs developing and adhering to.

Established Chemicals

Acids

Chiral Carboxylic Acids are group of chemicals already obtained from FSCW. They have a wide range of applications including food, cleaning and pharmaceuticals.

Sugars

Sugars are another established group of chemicals obtained from many sources of FSCW across Europe. They are extensively used in food and drink production.

Terpenes

Extensively used in a wide range of food, cleaning and pharmaceuticals and are obtainable from not only FSCW but from lignocellulosic biomass.


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Promising Chemicals

Phenols

Another promising chemical group. Starting with Furan, derivatives can be used as speciality solvents or incorporated into various pharmaceuticals.

Furans

Another promising chemical group. Starting with Furan, derivatives can be used as speciality solvents or incorporated into various pharmaceuticals.


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Materials

PEF

Polyethylene Furanoate, currently made from sugar cane, has the potential to be extracted from bagasse (sugar cane waste). It is an alternative versatile plastic source.

PLA

Poly-lactic acid, derived from sugar cane, has extensive uses as a plastic, to be used in 3D printers, to make plastic tea bags or hard plastic toys. It is also biodegradable.

PHA

Polyhydroxyalkanoates produced from sugar or lipids can be formed into packing or plastics that biodegrade in cold temperatures, the ocean or in-vivo.


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Fuels

BioButanol

Produced from a variety of feedstocks it has a higher energy density and lower volatility than ethanol; making it safer to use. It can be developed with no impact on food supplies.

BioDiesel

Derived from waste oils in the food chain it only releases the same amount of carbon the plant absorbed when growing. Standard diesel engines can run on Biodiesel.

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