STAR-ProBio

World Food Waste Network

STAR-ProBio aims to create a set of standards for bio-based products, which allows consumers to be confident in the product quality.

The European Commission's proposal for the advancement of the European economy is smart, sustainable, inclusive growth. Targets include: research and development investment; a reduction in green house gases and; an increase in energy efficiency. And moving towards bio-based products will help achieve these targets. 

With the production of oil slowing across the EU and bans on the extraction of fuels from shale in certain countries, increases the demand for more sustainable products that can easily replace those traditionally made from fossil fuels.

Sustainability assessment schemes need to be developed in order to ensure consumer and manufacturer confidence in these new bio-based products. These schemes will provide a clear and evidence based view of the economic, social and environmental impacts of such products promoting market uptake.

In order to achieve this H2020 funding has been awarded for three-years to a collaboration of 15 institutions from 11 countries, including many from across the EUBIS network, led by the Action’s Vice-Chair Piergiuseppe Morone, who will work on a sustainability scheme blueprint.

A PROJECT OF GREAT RELEVANCE FOR THE BIO-ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT

PETER JÜRGEN, REDCERT , DE

At present, food from different locations is likely to have different compositions and thus whatever the end product is unlikely to have the same levels of purity. To overcome this the members of the collaboration will develop standards, labels and certifications for bio-based products. These new products will be compared to their oil-based counterparts (used as a benchmark) improving public and industry confidence and increasing their commercial viability.

STANDARDISATION IS LACKING BEHIND INNOVATION

NICK GATHERGOOD, TALLINN TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY, EE

To achieve the aim of the collaboration, the environmental impacts of products, with a focus on the end-of-life and a transition to a circular economy, will be assessed through Life Cycle Analysis, social impact assessment, surveys and field experiments.

Specific case studies will include: construction materials, bio-based polymers and fine chemicals ensuring that the research is not too broad and theoretic and allowing for a non-bio benchmark.
Sustainability assessment research will be divided into the following research areas: economic, social and environmental; with different research institutions taking a lead on each. These will feed and be fed by: the sustainability scheme blueprint along; current regulations and; knowledge transfer, training and dissemination.

This collaboration will make fundamental inroads to making bio-based products in a circular economy a reality.

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